The Uncommon Life

Uncommon sense for an unconventional life

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The perils of personal progress

The perils of personal progress

Posted by in ALL posts, Fear & Risk, Lifestyle Design, Practical Philosophy | 17 comments

Common: Attempting to play “the game” better than the person next to us.

Uncommon: We all want to consider ourselves a “winner” — to be great at something—and to have someone recognize that greatness. But embedded in this thought process is the belief that greatness is measured on a comparative scale and that fulfillment follows closely behind such accomplishments.

I call BS on both accounts. As I’ve written earlier, success has nothing to do with being part of an “elite” group. Instead of trying to play the game better than other participants, the happiest, most innovative and “free” individuals I’ve met work to change the game itself. They operate by rules that change the rules.

A friend of mine, Charlie Hoehn, not only believes this is true, but his life is an eminent example of this theory in practice. Charlie is a true “uncommoner.” He’s travelled the world, spoken at TEDx Carnegie Mellon, written the highly popular manifesto Recession Proof Graduate, and has worked closely with many Mavericks such as Tim Ferriss, Seth Godin, Ramit Sethi, and Tucker Max. You can learn more about him here.

Along his relatively short (still in his mid twenties) but admirable journey through life, Charlie has learned that if you get stuck playing the wrong game with the wrong yardstick, progress itself becomes a liability (Tweet this quote). But I’ll let him take it from here…

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One emotion at a time – A practical philosophy for conquering fear

One emotion at a time – A practical philosophy for conquering fear

Posted by in ALL posts, Fear & Risk, Practical Philosophy | 3 comments

Common: To view one’s natural emotional tendencies as impulsive, fleeting, and simultaneous.

Uncommon: I grew up with what appeared to be several innate and undefeatable fears: Heights, claustrophobia (enclosed spaces), and public speaking among the worst of them. Perhaps you can relate to one or more.

After 12 years of willingly subjecting myself to numerous psychological theories and tests and observing the effects, the work in my mental dojo has allowed me to make what I feel is major progress towards mental liberation.

Some examples include giving hundreds of speeches in multiple countries, spelunking in dark, cold, wet caverns hundreds of feet below the earth’s surface, bungee jumping, and most recently, skydiving.

A few weeks ago I not only brought myself to jump out of a plane, I found skydiving to be one of the most serene, calming, and rejuvenating experiences of my life. Why (and how) the extreme pendulum shift? I’ll tell you.

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The unreasonable power of embracing paradox – How uncommon results are birthed

The unreasonable power of embracing paradox – How uncommon results are birthed

Posted by in ALL posts, Entrepreneurship, Lifestyle Design, Practical Philosophy | 2 comments

Common: The belief that the path to great success is paved with compromises.

Uncommon: It’s my hope that this post unravels this common assumption about success because, left unaddressed, it becomes a subtle psychological gash that hemorrhages one’s hope (and chances) of producing extraordinary results.

I believe most readers of this blog want to experience an uncommon life of their own making. But such a pursuit is often met with common advice that, well, leads to a very common life. If you’ve shared your “unreasonable” ambitions with the world, then chances are you’ve likely encountered counsel that fits the following model:

In order to get ‘x’ you must be prepared to give up ‘y.’

It’s the classic case of a false dichotomy — the misleading presentation of a situation in which only two alternatives are offered. We’re taught that we can have one OR the other, but never both.

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A recent collection of artfully uncommon musings

A recent collection of artfully uncommon musings

Posted by in ALL posts, Entrepreneurship, Lifestyle Design, Practical Philosophy, Productivity | 0 comments

I know, my recent absence has been abominable. But I have not been MIA without taking my creativity with me.

In fact, I’ve actually been quite busy creating and sharing thoughts for an uncommon life.  Those who subscribe to my other blog, Maxims4Mavericks, know exactly what I’m talking about.

Roughly three times per week I have been sharing concise advice alongside a colorful, thought-provoking image — or as I call it, “paradigm bending pop-art.”

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The raw truth about finding your passion

The raw truth about finding your passion

Posted by in ALL posts, Fear & Risk, Practical Philosophy | 12 comments

Common: Believing that passion strikes us serendipitously and miraculously changes our life for the better.

Uncommon: Take a quick gaze into the world of non-fiction literature and there is one word that cannot be ignored: passion.

Authors, speakers, leaders, and gurus use this word with a near religious application – as though it’s the alchemist’s secret to wielding the famed Midas touch. They preach that passion is an indispensable part of personal success and happiness.

Based on this introduction, you might be surprised to read this next statement: I agree with them. Passion is one very important element (of many) that produces extraordinary results.

What frustrates me (and many people who read these statements about passion) is that the process to attaining this ‘transformational’ passion is often overlooked or described as though the Gods endow it. Either way doesn’t help.

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The ‘exchange of value’ solution – And something you may not know about me

The ‘exchange of value’ solution – And something you may not know about me

Posted by in ALL posts, Fear & Risk, Lifestyle Design, Practical Philosophy | 1 comment

Common: Listening to advice and temporary barriers that bury inner passions.

Uncommon: If you’ve read my work before you’re probably aware of my past in publishing, writing, public speaking, and if you know me really well, my real estate endeavors. But there is another part of my past that you probably don’t know about.

I love drawing and design. A lot.

I’ve designed most everything having to do with Cool Stuff Media, Inc., The Uncommon Life, and Maxims for Mavericks. What most people don’t realize is that this love for art began at a young age conquering coloring books and sketch books with an unusual fervor.

I wasn’t a natural born prodigy, but I was committed – and passionate. As a young teenager and mediocre academic student, I clung to my interest in art for creative stimulation. The pages of my schoolbooks were barraged with sketches and fictional company logos. Despite my math teacher’s disenchantment with my artistic efforts, my passion and tenacity began to pay off.  In high school, to my complete surprise, I experienced national success and recognition for my efforts in art and design classes.

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